professor holding mechanical design component
Research

The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering has a vibrant research environment motivated by our dedicated faculty. Our research programs are funded by many government agencies. In addition to the government, working with academia and industry is part of our focus. We have established large-scale collaborations with major industrial companies including General Electric, Raytheon, and Northrop.

Research activities at the department can be classified by research areas and by research centers. The department offers eight research areas of focus bringing together a wide range of faculty expertise. The department also leads two research centers, including the Center for High Rate Nanomanufacturing and the Healthcare Systems Engineering Institute, both federally funded.

Faculty also conduct research in their labs and are part of college-wide Research Initiatives. View faculty profiles to learn about their research, including work being conducted in their laboratories. Also, view our Scholarship Reports.


Recent News

Robotic arm attached to Peter Whitney's arm.

Advancing Remote Robotic Technology

MIE Assistant Professor Peter Whitney has been working to design lightweight nimble robotic arms that could be capable of remote surgery or other situations where safety might be a factor. Nimble robotic arms that perform delicate surgery may be one step closer to reality Main photo: Robotics researchers at Northeastern are advancing a technology to […]

Advancing How AI Can Augment Designer Performance

MIE Assistant Professor Mohsen Moghaddam is the PI of a $614K NSF grant with co-PIs Tucker Marion (D’Amore-McKim) and Paolo Ciuccarelli (CAMD), in collaboration with Lu Wang from the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor, for the project “From User Reviews to User-Centered Generative Design: Automated Methods for Augmented Designer Performance.”

Anti-nodes of resonant waveform of typical glycerol droplets with arrows indicating the waveform amplitudes. In seesaw mode (m = 1), h = 0.923 mm, dp = 3.71 mm, and f * = 63 Hz. Pictures show t = 0, ¼ and ½ of the oscillating period. In saddleback mode (m = 2), h = 0.91 mm, dp = 3.48 mm, f * = 78 Hz, and D ≈ 1.17 × 10−7 N·m. Views from the side and an oblique meridional angle are shown. The dashed lines show the two orthogonal axes of C4 symmetry. In monkey saddle mode (m = 3), h = 0.63 mm, dp = 4.36 mm, f * = 105 Hz, and D ≈ 6.46 × 10−8 N·m with a C6 symmetry. Arrows show the alternating crests and valleys. The finite element simulation using ABAQUS is shown on the right, by which flexural rigidity is deduced. The color code shows out-of-plane displacement from the equatorial neutral plane.

MIE Research Selected as Editor’s Choice of Physics of Fluids

A research paper, titled, “Flexural bending resonance of acoustically levitated glycerol droplet” by PhD student Zilong Fang, Profs. Wan and Taslim was selected as the Editor’s choice and published in the journals of Physics of Fluids.

Creating a Low-Cost, Digital Biosensor to Detect Protein Biomarkers

MIE Professor Hongwei Sun, in collaboration with the University of Connecticut, is leading a $430K NSF grant for “A Low-Cost, “Digital” Biosensing Platform with Single Protein Biomarker Sensitivity”.